The Graywater Blog

News about our projects, the drought, green community news, and regulations that affect our customers.

Spending Green to Appear Green

Spending Green to Appear Green

We’re really beginning to see the residual effects of the drought. Of course, shortening personal water usage is a must, but the means by which we’ve achieved this is sometimes a little preposterous.

For instance, instead of letting one’s lawn just turn brown as a symbol of solidarity with fighting California’s drought, we’re seeing people who willingly spend money to have their grass spray-painted green. That way, it will create the illusion that the lawn is watered without having to actually water it.

Time and again, we have to point out the apparently-not-so-obvious: It doesn’t have to be this way!

Seriously, if you look into graywater recycling systems and/or rainwater capture systems, you’ll see that you can keep your lawn NATURALLY green during the drought, and you won’t have to answer to those who are quick to pull the drought shaming card on you.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way!

It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way!

Now that the drought conditions have managed to surpass the pinnacle of extremity, we’re starting to see the changes that come as a result. An immediately apparent change has been home landscaping. People are either not watering their lawns and letting them turn brown, or uprooting their grass, and in turn landscaping with drought resistant (low water usage), native Californian plants, mostly succulents. The traditional green lawn and daily soundtrack of the AM sprinkler system is all but a distant memory. Maybe it will turn into something like VCRS: we can tell our kids about it, but they won’t ever really know what it was like. It will just become one of those points to remind us of how old we are.

Whether or not you are on board with these new, and at many times necessary changes, we’re here to tell you: It doesn’t have to be this way!

For those who are more sustainably aware, and have knowledge of the innovation and technology like our own, landscaping isn’t such a green and brown issue. As a matter of fact, there’s a big gray area not being utilized. It just so happens to be graywater recycling systems.

With our residential gray water recycling system, you can play a bigger role than anyone with a dirt lawn without actually having to turn your lawn into dirt. Our systems are designed to capture perfectly suitable water for your irrigation needs and put it to use. If you have not gotten up to date with the wanders that graywater recycling systems have to offer, maybe you should look into us a little more!

 

By: Jay Berstein

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Reduce the Use: Water Footprints

Reduce the Use: Water Footprints

In the face of extreme drought conditions bestowed upon California, we now turn our attention to reducing our water footprint. As you can infer, the term “water footprint” references our individual water-use habits and the overall impact it may leave on our finite water supply. There are numerous ways to reduce the use, many of which come as a natural result of our work.

By installing our graywater recycling systems and/or rainwater capture systems, water is being repurposed and reused to its full capacity. This in and of itself is a way for someone to drastically reduce their water footprint! Our rainwater capture systems can make use of thousands of gallons of rainwater and recycle it through your irrigation systems and toilets. It’s unbelievable how much you can reduce your water footprint by implementing innovative technology like ours!

 

By: Jay Berstein

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Radioactive Parody

Radioactive Parody

Sometimes it feels as if governmental agencies prioritize in ways that are beyond the ordinary person’s understanding. The most recent headscratcher is the release of 850 tons of “filtered” water that was once used to cool nuclear reactors at the Fukushima plant, which, as you know, suffered the worst radioactive accident in the past century in March of 2011. A third-party has claimed that “the radioactive content was below measurable limits”, permitting the plant to release the filtered water directly into the ocean. This raises the question: what measurable limits are we going by? Is “just a little radioactively harmful” permissible by this standard?

The parody we find in this is endless. What a brave new world we live in. We can release 850 tons of potentially radioactive water into the ocean, but at the same time, there are strenuous regulations (and a lack of incentives) for those wanting to implement rainwater capture systems and/or graywater recycling systems.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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How to Suppress Water Usage and Fires Simultaneously

How to Suppress Water Usage and Fires Simultaneously

Rainwater reclamation and reuse systems are known for conserving water on a massive scale, a notable achievement in and of itself. But, in some cases, it can save a person’s livelihood while making the job of firefighters more practical and cost effective.

A recent publication suggests that the widespread use of rainwater capture systems can drastically cut-back the financial burden that arises when our firefighters are put to work.

Think about it. There is a raging wildfire. There is no body of water nearby. Obviously, the helicopters still need water to contain the fire. How do we get it? To say the least, it’s an arduous process that is not only financially straining, but physically taxing. Firefighters are forced to collaborate with water trucks. The trucks are driven to a safe location to fill their tanks, the helicopters picks the tanks up, and the cycle repeats itself. The process is far from practical.

This is where rainwater capture systems come in. Based on a implementation of tanks in Chile (for this very purpose), studies suggest that this technology has shown to be “an exceptional opportunity for minimizing firefighting costs”. Why not make use of the rainwater we have in California too?

Perhaps isolated farm regions surrounded by substantial forestry should be subject to policies that encourage the most effective measure to ensure their livelihoods, homes and in extreme cases, their lives.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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Why El Nino can be our amigo

Why El Nino can be our amigo

The latest publications are suggesting that this year’s El Nino will be comparable to Godzilla. That being the case, we can’t help but ask: what role can our rainwater capture systems play?

The answer is this: a huge one!

This year’s El Nino, according to NASA climatologists, has the potential to be unprecedented in severity. If you think it’s a gimmick, the Australia Bureau of Meteorology says the odds of this monstrosity are at 70%. So, again, what does this imply?

With our rainwater capturing systems, we directly stream water drainage from your roof into a tank (or multiple tanks) ranging from a one thousand to thirty thousand gallon holding capacity. Consider this: every inch of rainfall on your roof accounts for about 1,869 gallons of water. With proper drainage, our systems can capture every last gallon. The rainwater is then filtered, circulated, and recycled into your irrigation systems and toilets. It is practicality and ecological mindfulness all in one.

We know droughts are commonplace in California. Why not reconsider how to make use of the rainwater we actually get? With the upcoming El Nino’s incomparable downpour, it’s a worthy consideration.

 

By: Jay Berstein & Jeff Garrison

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Why Snowpack Matters and a Rain Water Capture System will too!

Why Snowpack Matters and a Rain Water Capture System will too!

16 of the last 28 years have been negative Snow Level Water Equivalents

El Nino doesn’t guarantee Snow Pack

California has a long way to go.

California’s current Snow Water Equivalents by Region – http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action

Most of us assume if we have more rain, like that which is expected in the upcoming El Nino event, our drought issues will be resolved. The unfortunate reality of the situation is that warm rains do nothing to increase California’s dreadfully low snowpack, which is the unknown key player in maintaining California’s water supply.

The numbers are nothing short of surprising. A weather.com article quantifies some of the impacts on our absurdly low snowpack, which entails that the most recent drought has resulted in 34 billion gallons of water lost when compared to last year’s measurements, and this is for just the Lake Tahoe basin. Based on recent measurements of snowpack levels, there is only enough water to supply California’s needs for another year and a half.

With the pace at which our snowpack is developing (and trust us it is slow), we are going to see a continuous pattern to our drought-related struggles.

Given the tangible urgency, now is the time to further investigate the idea of a Rainwater and / or a Graywater recycling system, which effectively reduces household water usage by up to thirty percent.

A 3,000 square foot surface area will capture 1,869 gallons of rainwater for every inch of rain. Since California’s rain events in populated areas are typically less than an inch per storm, our rainwater capture systems will allow for storage and usage of water in between rainfall.

 

By: Jay Berstein & Jeff Garrison

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