The Graywater Blog

News about our projects, the drought, green community news, and regulations that affect our customers.

We are now NSF 350 CERTIFIED!

We are now NSF 350 CERTIFIED!

Happy 2017 Everyone!  Cries of, New Year – New Me, are ringing out across the world and we at Water Recycling Systems (WRS) have decided to join in on the fun! WRS is proud to announce that we now offer an NSF 350 certified Graywater System, the “Aqualoop Graywater System” by Ecovie!

Some of our readers may be unaware of what exactly NSF 350 means and why this new certification is such a big deal.  For those readers here’s a quick background on NSF 350 and its benefits.

Recycled graywater with NSF 350 approval allows the treated water to be stored without time restraints.  Where codes permit, NSF 350 water can be used for spray irrigation, flushing toilets, and poses no health threats. A big part of achieving NSF certification is that high water quality standards must be met over a 6 month period of stress testing with no human interaction.

Aqualoop is the only system to meet both commercial and residential NSF 350 standards. Water with a NSF 350 certification will easily meet local codes for permitting and is now being required in national and international level code guidelines.  NSF 350 is the gold standard in low impact green oriented construction for graywater recycling.

Here at WRS we are elated to reach this milestone in our company’s history.  This new certification will help us further expand our operations and will allow us to provide our clients with the absolute highest quality recycled water!  New Year – New Me indeed!

 

 

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A Famous Santa Monica Home, It’s Architect, And A New Rainwater System

A Famous Santa Monica Home, It’s Architect, And A New Rainwater System

The Meridian House, this wonder of architecture sits just off Ocean Park Blvd in the heart of Santa Monica, California. It’s architect and owner is Thane Roberts. As 2015 came to a close Thane had one goal in mind, to continue to make his home as self sufficient and low impact as possible. His next step was Rainwater Capture and Re-Use. Water Recycling Systems stepped in to help him achieve that goal.

During the home’s construction Thane made the wise decision to install dual rainwater plumbing. This inexpensive decision is something we always encourage as it allows for easy installation of a Water Recycling System at a later date. With this pre-existing plumbing in place Water Recycling Systems was able to quickly install a Rainwater Re-Use System featuring high strength filtration and UV disinfection. Thane’s captured Rainwater is cleaned to a degree that allows him to legally use it for spray irrigation and hardscape wash down.

News of this accomplishment reached the offices of The City of Santa Monica, and soon after completion we found ourselves giving a tour of the system to members of The California Water Resources Board. Santa Monica continues to be a forward thinking, drought conscious municipality and the work done by Water Recycling Systems entitled Thane to a hefty rebate.

Further information about Thane Roberts, his architecture, and The Meridian House can be found here.

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L.A.’S New LID Stormwater Regulations And The Broadway Job

L.A.’S New LID Stormwater Regulations And The Broadway Job

In early 2015 the city of Los Angeles embarked on an unprecedented campaign to capture, control, and reuse stormwater.  New rules and regulations, titled L.I.D (Low Impact Development), were put into place to define how both residential and commercial developments capture and control their stormwater.

A major tenant of LID states that any new development in Los Angeles must capture and control rainwater that falls onto the property.  By releasing the captured water at a set rate the development helps to protect our water shed and saves the L.A. storm drain system from overload.  Here at WRS we appreciate the cities desire to protect our most valuable resource, but we also ask the question, “If you must capture, why not reuse?”

This mantra drove our work at “The Broadway Job” a seven story commercial building in downtown Los Angeles.  WRS helped design, build and install a state of the art Rainwater Capture and Reuse System that feeds the building’s ecologically friendly Green Roof.  Further pictures and media can be found in the photo gallery section – http://reusegraywater.com/photos/ .  We are proud to help L.A. continue to save its most precious resource and we feel The Broadway Job was a great first step into the world of LID.

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Warranted Optimism?

Warranted Optimism?

A recent Nasdaq Publication has given us insight on a California based company and its stock market integrity. As the post says, California Water Group’s “shares are currently trading up about 0.9% on the day.”

For those not aware, the California Water Group is a collective effort to mitigate water usage. In short, they manage water utilities and systems on a large scale across multiple states. So what exactly does their stock market success entail for us?

One thing this indicates for us is that the water drought may actually be taken seriously! If the individual stock has risen above its 200 day average, it obviously entails the success within CWP. This increase could also be indicative of the need to monitor the use of California’s extremely short supply of water (which we’re sure you never heard about that until now).

Either way, we can be of great service to this small boom in what we call the “water-related stock exchange”. By providing technology with cunning proficiency, we effectively mitigate the urgency that is California’s water situation. By repurposing and recycling materials that would otherwise be put to waste, we alleviate and help reverse the process of this excruciating drought.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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When Water Supplies Plummet, So Do Property Values

When Water Supplies Plummet, So Do Property Values

Among the many issues associated with the drought (financial hits to the agricultural sector and the degradation of delicate ecosystems) is one that quite literally hits close to home. The lesser known drought-related detriment is the surprising decrease in property values.

How is it that a state whose water use is 80% accounted for by the agricultural sector (while being accountable for 2% of the state’s GDP) has a drought which effects individual property values? The issue is this: with a greater part of the US having one sort of dependency or another on California’s agricultural doings, it’s hard not to justify the seemingly excessive water usage. It’s a huge economic driver for California, and we’ve seen before how massive a hit the drought can cause for such an important part of our economy. That being the case, Governor Brown issued mandatory cutbacks of 20% or more from residential water users rather than the agricultural sector.

With that in mind, the financial impact of the drought has to go someplace, and unfortunately it has been delegated to individuals in California residences and their forever fluctuating property values. To find out more about this not-so-apparent connection, read here.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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Public Enemy #1: The Wet Prince

Public Enemy #1: The Wet Prince

We’re sure our LA readers have heard about the individual who has been recognized informally as California’s Wet Prince of Bel Air, as The Center for Investigative Reporting titled the individual. Pseudonyms aside, this person/household has become a notorious figure in the water world, especially in the realm of drought shaming, and here’s why: this single Bel Air household effectively guzzled 11.8 million gallons of water in the past year, which likely amounted to a ninety thousand dollar yearly water bill.

From our point of view, this is rather disturbing. An already finite resource, which has been pushed beyond its limit as of late, has been notably exhausted by a single residence in the already lushly green Bel Air neighborhoods.

I mean, at the very least, if you have ninety grand a year to invest in water usage, why not cut the bill by thirty percent (along with your water usage). The not-so-hidden secret is this: Graywater recycling systems and/or rainwater capture systems! In case you have not heard, they effectively lower a residence’s water usage (and ultimately the water bill) by about thirty percent. If this household was equipped with our technology, the amount of water being used annually would be reduced by over three and a half million gallons!

 

By: Jay Berstein

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The Simpler Solution

The Simpler Solution

As of a few hours ago, reports are coming out saying that our friends at California Water Fix have proposed a fifteen billion dollar solution to the currently outdated water facilities in California. Their solution is this: construct “two 30-mile-long tunnels up to 150 feet belowground to divert water from the northern edge of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta”. Inevitably, this has further opened the floodgates of rage that is today’s California water war. As with a majority of politicized issues, special interest groups are either strongly for or against said fifteen billion dollar plan. You can read more about it here.

But what can we do about it? If we want to combat the limited water supply on a personal level, it can only be through a consistent daily regimen of saving water, and even reusing it. That’s what we’re all about. We can invest that same fifteen billion and connect a ton of structures (residential or commercial) with our graywater/rainwater capture systems and save an unquantifiable amount of water. That’s our business.

 

By: Jay Berstein

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